In Texas, Child childcare agreements post-divorce are rarely as simple as one parent getting the kids. In fact, you will probably find that this is one of the most detailed sections of any divorce you encounter in the state.

As to whether you could get full custody of your children, that truly depends on the details of your situation. This article will briefly look at the language of child custody in Texas and some of the concerns you would commonly find discussed during this stage of divorce.

As mentioned on FindLaw, custody in Texas is called conservatorship. In the simplest terms, the law sees a conservator is someone who takes care of someone else. This is a position that would hold specific responsibilities and privileges per statute — and pursuant to the terms of your divorce agreement.

The court, in most cases, would operate under the presumption that both you and your co-parent should have joint conservatorship of your children. Beyond that, in a typical situation, it would be up to you to determine what exactly worked for your family. You would probably work out a standard possession order during the divorce to catalog the details.

The details in question could vary widely depending on what you expected your lives to look like after divorce. For example, if you or your ex planned to move, you may want to include terms in your agreement about who would pay for transportation expenses, hotel rooms for chaperones or other applicable costs associated with your custody schedule.

Although it may not seem like it at first, there is often a good deal of flexibility in the Texas child custody laws. You could have the opportunity to create a parenting plan that is as unique as your family. With that in mind, please do not use this for any other general article as legal advice. This is only background information.